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Making use of your garden means it looks great, has positive effects on the environment and importantly, for children, helps them to understand where the food they eat comes from

PlantforLife supports Change4Life initiative in a bid to champion gardening as a great way to keep active

PlantforLife announces their support for the Change4Life campaign, and will be working with them in a move to encourage adults and children to get gardening and get in shape. As a new partner, PlantforLife aims to highlight the health and well-being benefits that both plants and gardening can provide to the whole family.

Statistics show, if we carry on as we are, 9 out of 10 of today’s children risk growing up with dangerous levels of fat in their bodies and new research highlights less than half of adults (48%) achieve up to their recommended 30 active minutes 5 times a week and only a third of children (33%) achieve 60 minutes a day. The research also found that most adults (18%) blame lack of time for not achieving their recommended amount, and children would rather play computer games, watch T.V. or read than exercise (17%) .

PlantforLife aims to challenge this common mindset and show UK families how easy, fun and most importantly how beneficial gardening can be. Research proves just two and a half hours of gardening a week can improve an adult’s fitness levels whilst helping to
• Reduce the risk of heart disease
• Reduce the risk of type two diabetes
• Lower blood pressure
• Improve mental and physical fitness
• Encourage children to be more active in their daily life

To show families how to make the most of their gardens, PlantforLife has joined forces with personal trainer to the stars, Kevin Adams and celebrity plantsman Chris Collins. Together they have helped PlantforLife develop a downloadable guide to encourage exercise in the garden and show how to plant your way to 5 a day.

Kevin Adams says, “Exercise should be fun, not a chore. Gardening is a fantastic way to work out the whole body from digging to weeding you really can work up a sweat and achieve a full body work out. Getting your children involved is easy – they love being outside and always want to help so why not buy them some mini tools and give them their own section of the garden to look after and maintain?”

Encouraging people to lead a more active lifestyle is only part of the aim. PlantforLife in support of Change4Life wants to show families that planting and eating fruit and vegetables results in healthier eating habits as well as a more active lifestyle.

Chris Collins comments, “Making use of your garden means it looks great, has positive effects on the environment and importantly, for children, helps them to understand where the food they eat comes from. Encouraging children to grow fruit and vegetables in their own garden has numerous benefits for example those who plant and grow their own foods are more likely to taste, and like them and of course, it teaches them how to garden from an early age!”

To discover how gardening can help to keep you and your family healthy visit http://www.plantforlife.info/activelife and download your free tips and advice from Chris Collins and Kevin Adams.

- Ends -

For further information, please contact the Red Consultancy via email: HTAteam@redconsultancy.com or call:

• Anna Golding T. 0207 025 6555
• Harriet Chamberlain T. 020 7025 6578

Notes to Editors:

PlantforLife
PlantforLife has been created by the Horticultural Trades Association with the aim of helping people to make the most out of their garden with gardening advice, information and inspirational ideas, highlighting the health and well-being benefits of plants and gardening.

Change4Life
If you could help local families make small changes for a healthier future, why not get involved? Find out how at www.nhs.uk/change4life (click on ‘partners and supporters’) or call 0300 123 3434*

*Calls to 03 numbers should cost no more than geographic 01 or 02 UK-wide calls, and may be part of inclusive minutes subject to your provider and your call package.


References:

Butland B, Jebb S, Kopelman P, McPherson K, Thomas S, Mardell J, Parry V. (2007). Foresight Tackling Obesities: Future Choices – Project report
Survey of 1708 adults on Exercise Patterns, OnePoll, 10th February 2010
Survey of 1708 adults on Exercise Patterns, OnePoll, 10th February 2010
Park, S-A, Shoemaker, C. and Haub, M. (2009). Physical and psychological health conditions of older adults classified as gardeners or nongardeners. HortScience, 44:206–210
Park, S-A, Shoemaker, C. and Haub, M. (2009). Physical and psychological health conditions of older adults classified as gardeners or nongardeners. HortScience, 44:206–210
Walsh, J.M.E., Rogo-Pressman, A., Cauley, J.A. and Browner, W.S. (2001). Predictors of physical activity in community-dwelling elderly white women. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 16: 721-727
Park, S-A, Shoemaker, C. and Haub, M. (2009). Physical and psychological health conditions of older adults classified as gardeners or nongardeners. HortScience, 44:206–210

This press release was distributed by ResponseSource Press Release Wire on behalf of The Red Consultancy in the following categories: Children & Teenagers, Health, Leisure & Hobbies, Home & Garden, Women's Interest & Beauty, Environment & Nature, for more information visit https://pressreleasewire.responsesource.com/about.