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Nikon research reveals that almost half of parents in the UK admit to taking more photographs of their eldest child

November 2010, Nikon UK – Research from Nikon has revealed that almost half* (46%) of mums and dads in the UK admit to taking more pictures of their first born child.

In a study covering 14 regions across Europe and South Africa, Spain’s parents top the list when it comes to photo favouritism, with 70% taking more images of their eldest son or daughter. Parents in Lithuania are the most even-handed with just over a third (34%) saying they took more pictures of their eldest child.

This is not going unnoticed by the children either with 34% of UK siblings agreeing that the oldest brother or sister appeared the most in the family photo album. When parents were asked why they took less photographs of their younger children, time pressures (46%) was the most popular answer, followed by parents not realising that more photos had been taken until they looked back (34%). Also, it seems dads are more likely to get bored of taking pictures of their expanding family, with one in five claiming the photos got repetitive, compared to 15% of mums.

The research of well over 1,000 people in the UK has also shown dads to be the fairest parent with 54% of mums revealing they took more pictures of their eldest child, compared to just 35% of dads. And it seems older doesn’t just mean wiser it also means fairer: 62% of parents aged 55+ said they took roughly equal amounts of pictures of their children, compared to 31% of parents in the 25-34 age group.

Nikon has also revealed the UKs favourite childhood image is the family holiday photo with one in five children saying pictures of the family on a sunny beach or visiting famous landmarks are their most cherished. Playing outside was the second favourite with 13% choosing this. The least popular were photos of eating food (3%) and school plays (2%). Interestingly, almost a quarter (24%) of British people said they didn’t like any photographs of them as a child and it’s men who are the most adverse with 29% choosing this option compared to 21% of women.

Internationally renowned educational psychologist, Dr Michele Borba, believes this parental favouritism could be contributing towards the theory of ‘Second Child Syndrome’, which looks at the impact of birth order on personality: “Sibling rivalry is common place in families, especially large families with three or more children. Whilst many parents might try and treat all their children the same it can be very easy for those little firsts that the eldest child makes – first step, first word, first day at school – to seem less remarkable with subsequent children. Nikon’s findings that more photographs appear of the eldest child is a great example of this and often parents do not realise they are doing it.

“Parents should make an effort to take a range of different photos of all children, both on their own as well as with the family, to ensure all children feel equal, loved and they maintain a sense of their own individuality.”

Jordi Brinkman, D-SLR product manager for Nikon Europe says: “It can be difficult for busy parents to capture all the action – especially as your family starts to grow. However, we are making it easier than ever to get the best quality family pictures and videos with the launch of the Nikon D3100 D-SLR camera.

“It is designed for newcomers to D-SLR photography, especially young families, because it is easier to get great quality images as well as videos without worrying about complicated functions or heavy camera equipment. With High Definition (HD) video and a built-in ‘Guide Mode’ taking you through camera settings step-by-step, you can hone your photography skills whilst still taking great pictures as you go.”

ENDS

Notes to Editors:

Research of 15,592 people from 14 European countries and South Africa was carried out by independent research agency, Opinion Matters, on behalf of Nikon. Full research available on request. This included researching 1413 British adults and adults from the following countries: Italy, Poland, Slovenia, Spain, Lithuania, France, the Netherlands, South Africa, Belgium, Czech Republic/Slovakia (combined as one region), Estonia, Romania and Latvia.

*Almost half (46%) of mums and dads in the UK admit to taking more pictures of their eldest child whilst growing up, 51% of parents took roughly the same amount of pictures of their first child and the remaining 3% took more photos of their younger child than their eldest.

The country responses to parents taking more pictures of their eldest child and sibling recognition of this is listed in order below:

Photo favouritism:

Spain
69%
Italy
68%
Slovenia
57%
France
56%
Netherlands
56%
Poland
56%
South Africa
53%
Belgium
50%
UK
46%
Czech Republic/Slovakia
44%
Estonia
43%
Romania
41%
Latvia
36%
Lithuania
34%

Sibling recognition:

South Africa
50%
France
48%
Italy
47%
Spain
46%
Poland
39%
Netherlands
37%
Belgium
36%
UK
34%
Romania
29%
Czech Republic/Slovakia
29%
Slovenia
29%
Lithuania
24%
Estonia
19%
Latvia
18%


About Dr. Michele Borba:

Michele’s child-rearing and parenting insights and solutions are universal. Her 22 award-winning parenting books have been translated in over 11 different languages including The Big Book of Parenting Solutions: 101 Answers to Your Everyday Challenges and Wildest Worries, No More Misbehavin’, and Building Moral Intelligence, and was named the Honorary Chairperson for the Implementation of Self-Esteem in Hong Kong. The National Association of Self-Esteem named her National Educator of the Year. As a motivational speaker to over one million participants, best selling author, and highly-sought after media personality, Michele helps families empower children to be strong from the inside out. Countless parents and educators rely on her solution-driven strategies to raise confident kids with strong minds, solid character and caring hearts. For more information on Michele Borba and her work refer to her website, www.micheleborba.com

About the Nikon D3100

The D3100 is designed for newcomers to D-SLR photography who want to take great family pictures and videos on the move without worrying about complicated functionality. A range of automatic settings means the camera is doing all the hard work much like on a compact camera: Live View with Scene Auto Selector selects the mode that matches any shooting situation; Scene Recognition delivers sharply defined images by analyzing the scene and optimizing the camera settings immediately before the shutter is released; and Guide Mode will take you step-by-step through the process of how to get the picture you want. In addition the 14.2 megapixel D3100 D-SLR camera can switch instantly to video mode, enabling you to record brilliant HD movie clips with sound.
You can find more information here.

NOT FOR PUBLICATION:

Press contacts:

Jenny Grace / Claudia Paul
Jenny.grace@nikon.co.uk / claudia.paul@nikon.co.uk
020 8247 1797 / 020 8481 6838
For more information about Nikon’s award winning products please visit www.nikon.co.uk


This press release was distributed by ResponseSource Press Release Wire on behalf of Nikon in the following categories: Children & Teenagers, Health, Leisure & Hobbies, Women's Interest & Beauty, Consumer Technology, for more information visit https://pressreleasewire.responsesource.com/about.