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New research highlights energy wasting habits, but reveals that Brits are keen to change their ways to save money

• 69% of Brits admit they use more energy than they need in the home
• But 97% say they are trying to save more energy
• And 74% say the biggest reason to reduce energy usage is to save money

London, 11th May 2011: A massive 96% of Brits are concerned about rising energy bills, but 69% admit their household is using more energy than it needs to, according to new research commissioned by Navetas.

However, following recent increases in energy prices and the impact of the winter months on bills, the survey of over 1,000 British adults also reveals the vast majority are keen to change their energy-wasting ways, with 97% of respondents saying they are trying to reduce their energy bills in 2011.

Energy wasting habits

The research reveals a number of ways that British households are using more electricity than necessary. Keeping appliances turned on or in standby tops the list of bad habits, cited by 56%, followed by leaving PCs or laptops running when not in use (51%) and leaving the lights on in empty rooms (46%). A third of Brits are also guilty of leaving TVs on in empty rooms.

In addition, around two-thirds (65%) of households with a washing machine still wash at 40 degrees or above and 34% use their tumble dryer at least three times a week. Around half set their thermostat to 21 degrees or above, with as many as one in five households opting for temperatures of 23 degrees or more.

A focus on energy saving for 2011

For 2011, many Brits are turning to a variety of energy-saving measures to reduce their bills, but shunning bigger projects like solar panels or double glazing. Only 6% of Brits have solar panels, with 81% opting not to have these installed because they can’t afford it or they don’t believe they will recapture the initial expense.

Instead, British households are opting for more simple approaches that will make a more immediate impact on their energy bills, with the majority requiring simple changes in behaviour rather than an initial outlay. These include replacing standard light bulbs with energy efficient ones (85%), using appliances more wisely, for example only filling the kettle based on how much water is needed (76%), and putting the heating on for less time (68%).

Chris Saunders, Chief Executive Officer of Navetas Energy Management, said: "With quarterly bills landing on doormats in April coupled with recent price increases, effective energy management is becoming imperative for many households. Currently, most bills only provide a total energy usage figure and that makes it very difficult for households to understand how they are using energy around the home.Consumers need detailed information about how and when they use household appliances and those that are the most energy-hungry.

”With these insights, consumers can take control of their energy use and focus their efforts on lasting behavoural changes that will make a significant impact on their energy consumption – and their bank accounts.”

-end-

Notes to Editors:


For media information, please contact:

Alizia Walker/ Rajinder Kaur
EML Wildfire
Tel: +44 20 8408 8000
Email: navetas@emlwildfire.com

About Navetas

Navetas is a UK-based technology company that empowers individuals, utilities and organisations to make better energy choices and find innovative new ways to reduce and manage energy consumption and minimise their environmental impact.

The company’s innovative technology can identify individual appliances and measure their energy consumption, providing rich data to help householders and businesses save money by using electrical appliances more efficiently.

For more information, visit www.navetas.com

This press release was distributed by ResponseSource Press Release Wire on behalf of Wildfire in the following categories: Personal Finance, Business & Finance, for more information visit https://pressreleasewire.responsesource.com/about.